The 3 Most Important Factors for Natural Skin Care

DnA

3 Most Important Factors for Natural Skin Care:

You know that you need to nourish your skin to keep it as healthy as possible. But are you getting enough of the right nutrients for its nourishment? Could you benefit from taking a supplement or trying an antioxidant-packed lotion?

“The beauty of the skin is that you can affect it from both inside and out,” says dermatologist Doris Day, MD, author of Forget the Facelift: Turn Back the Clock with a Revolutionary Program for Ageless Skin.

Here are the 3 most important factors for ageless healthy skin…

  • Nutrition
  • Digestive Health
  • Good Sleep. 
Nutrition:
 
Skin has been reported to reflect the general inner-health status and aging. Nutrition and its reflection on skin has always been an interesting topic for scientists and physicians throughout the centuries worldwide. Vitamins, carotenoids, tocopherols, flavonoids and a variety of plant extracts have been reported to possess potent anti-oxidant properties and have been widely used in the skin care industry either as topically applied agents or oral supplements in an attempt to prolong youthful skin appearance. 
 

One of the biggest motivations to adopt a more nutritious diet is the desire to improve skin health. Many people of all ages struggle with skin conditions such as acne, rosacea, dry skin, wrinkles, and sun damage, among others. This can be very upsetting for those who have yet to find a solution to their problematic skin. While conventional medical professionals often discount the connection between skin health and nutrition, there is strong evidence to support the influence of our food choices on the health and vibrancy of our skin.

The consumption of certain vitamins, minerals, and other beneficial compounds in the diet is one of the most effective ways to treat skin conditions and improve the look and feel of one’s skin. There are several nutrients that are known to play a role in the proper growth and immunity of the skin, and many people have found that their skin health has dramatically improved after making purposeful changes to their daily diet. 

Find Out More About Our Natural Skin Care SPA : Click Here

Vitamin A: Vitamin A, or retinol, is one of the most widely acknowledged nutrients for healthy skin. Vitamin A influences the physiology of the skin by promoting epidermal differentiation, modulating dermal growth factors, inhibiting sebaceous gland activity, and suppressing androgen formation. As it promotes cell turnover in the skin, vitamin A is effective in preventing the formation of comedones that cause the most common forms of acne. Lack of vitamin A causes the skin to become keratinized and scaly, and mucus secretion is suppressed. Rough, dry skin is a common sign of vitamin A deficiency, which often first appears as rough, raised bumps on the back of the arms.

Zinc: Zinc is an essential mineral that is an imperative part of many physiological functions, including structure in certain proteins and enzymes, and regulation of gene expression. It plays a role in immune function, protein synthesis, wound healing, DNA synthesis, and cell division. In skin, zinc assists in the proper structure of proteins and cell membranes, improves wound healing,  has anti-inflammatory effects, and protects against UV radiation.
Several studies indicate that dietary zinc may reduce acne, even as effectively as antibiotics such as tetracyclines. This may be because it interacts with vitamin A as a component of retinol-binding protein, which is necessary for transporting vitamin A in the blood.  Zinc supplementation has been shown to significantly increase the level of vitamin A in the blood, indicating an interaction between the two nutrients that may explain its positive effect on acne.

Vitamin C: Vitamin C has been known for decades to play a crucial role in the regulation of the structural protein collagen, which is necessary for the extracellular stability of the skin. A vitamin C deficiency causes scurvy, which is first manifested as rough dry skin and corkscrew hair growth. Inadequate vitamin C is also known to contribute to the development of the common problem of hyperkeratosis pillaris, as the follicles become damaged when collagen formation is impaired.

Increasing the amount of vitamin C in the diet can contribute to improved skin health and faster healing.

Find Out More About Our Natural Skin Care SPA : Click Here


Digestive System: 
Epidemiological evidence shows a clear association between gut problems and skin disorders. A recent report indicated that small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), a condition involving inappropriate growth of bacteria in the small intestine, is 10 times more prevalent in people with acne rosacea than in healthy controls, and that correction of SIBO in these individuals led to marked clinical improvement.
 
Intestinal permeability (a.k.a. “leaky gut”) causes both systemic and local inflammation, which in turn contributes to skin disease. Several medical studies showed acne patients were more likely to show enhanced reactivity to bacterial strains isolated from stool. 
 
Speaking of permeable barriers: most of you have heard of leaky gut by now, but what about “leaky skin”? The main function of the skin is to act as a physical, chemical and antimicrobial defense system. Studies have shown that bothstress and gut inflammation can impair the integrity and protective function of the epidermal barrier. 
 

The gut flora also influences the skin. Substance P is a neuropeptide produced in the gut, brain and skin that plays a major role in skin conditions. Altered gut microbiota promotes the release of substance P in both the gut and the skin, and probiotics can attenuate this response. The gut microbiota influences lipids and tissue fatty acid profiles, and may influence sebum production as well as the fatty acid composition of the sebum.  This may explain why a Russian study found that 54% of acne patients have significant alterations to the gut flora, and a Chinese study involving patients with seborrheic dermatitis also noted disruptions in the normal gut flora.

Find Out More About Our Natural Skin Care SPA : Click Here 

 

 Sleep: 
Untitled
Failing to get a good night’s sleep can leave you feeling grumpy and looking far from your best. However, a new study has shown that the effects of sleep deprivation on your face, your skin and your health can be truly alarming. Supermodel Jodie Kidd has taken part in a study conducted by Bensons For Beds to determine what the impact of getting just six hours shut-eye instead of the recommended eight is. The results, which were collected after the 30 female participants had just six hours of sleep for five nights in a row, were shocking.
 
Before they started the study, Jodie and the other participants were photographed and had their skin tested by a Visia machine, which maps and measures elements on the skin such as spots, pores, red areas, brown spots and porphyrins (bacteria on the skin). Once she’d completed her five nights, Jodie’s pores increased by 56% in number and 83% in visibility, She had 11% more spots which were 23% more visible, and the porphyrins on her skin went up by 65%. 
 

Why sleep is so vital

During the hours you are asleep, your body’s hydration rebalances and there is a rise in growth hormone as it repairs itself. That allows the skin to recover moisture and for damaged cells to be renewed.
“Sleep is a time for the body to heal, renew and eliminate toxins from the skin,” explains Dr Guy Meadows, founder of The Sleep School.

“When sleep is reduced, so is the body’s ability to carry out these functions. The study showed significant results over a period of just five days, yet the reality is many people are sleeping in this manner for weeks, months and even years, leading to long term consequences for their looks and how they feel about themselves.”

 Image

During the first three hours of sleep your body will start producing the human growth hormone from the pituitary gland.  As we age, this hormone is necessary for the maintenance of youthful and radiant skin. Without this hormone release skin is not repaired from daily damage and thus induces the aging process.

The middle two hours of sleep is when melatonin is increased.  Melatonin is a hormone that is responsible for regulating your circadian rhythm (sleep/wake patterns) but also acts as an antioxidant that helps protect the skin from damaging free radicals.

 

The final three hours, or during the active REM sleep stage, levels of cortisol (aka the stress hormone) decrease.  The skin’s temperature also drops to its lowest point allowing muscles to relax and become immobile, giving skin its deepest recovery of the night.   


Join Our Natural Skin Care SPA
Program includes:

  • How to know your skin type
  • Skin Spa with 9 Natural Products
  • Refreshment (Healthy Nutrition)

Regards,

Dr Simon MSH

Contact: 018 2055 215 (Dr Simon) or 016 9169 939 (Shireen)


Note:

Page generated in 0.548 seconds. Stats plugin by www.blog.ca